Introducing the latest insights in BRCA testing for breast cancer

In the past, BRCA testing was mainly used to assess hereditary risk. But now, BRCA testing has moved on and can be used intelligently to inform crucial treatment decisions.

Discover more about who, when and how to test below.

Who needs early BRCA testing?

Who needs early BRCA testing?

Testing patients’ BRCA mutation status based on their age, disease subtype and family history can help inform treatment strategies.2,3

Numerous factors impact eligibility for BRCA testing

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Why do I need to perform early BRCA testing?

BRCA mutation testing can reveal important information about familial risk and help to inform potential treatment options of BRCA-related cancers.1,2

Test routinely to inform treatment decisions

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How do I conduct BRCA testing?

How do I conduct BRCA testing?

In breast cancer, genetic testing generally involves testing for germline BRCA1/2 mutations, or mutations in BRCA in addition to other genes.2,4,5

Appropriate testing can help determine treatment options

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How do I interpret the results of a BRCA test and what does it mean for patients?

How do I interpret the results of a BRCA test and what does it mean for patients?

Genetic test results can be challenging to interpret due to the large number of genetic variations in tumour DNA, which are unique to any given patient. Proper understanding and communication of test results are critical to patient care.5,6

BRCA test results can impact prognosis and treatment options

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How can genetic counselling be streamlined by the multidisciplinary team

How can genetic counselling be streamlined by the multidisciplinary team?

Test turnaround times and genetic counselling can be barriers to BRCA testing.2 The oncogenetic pathway can provide patients earlier access to counselling.7

The oncogenetic pathway aims to streamline testing

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National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®) makes no warranties of any kind whatsoever regarding their content, use or application and disclaims any responsibility for their application or use in any way.

References:

  1. Larsen MJ et al. Breast Cancer (Auckl). 2014; 8:145-155.
  2. Hoogerbrugge N and Jongmans MC. Eur J Hum Genet. 2016; 24: S19-S26.
  3. Pal et al. Cancer Control. 2012; 19: 255-66.
  4. Wallace AJ. Eur J Hum Genet. 2016; 24: S10-S18.
  5. National Cancer Institute. BRCA1 and BRCA2: Cancer Risk and Genetic Testing. Available at:
    https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/causes-prevention/genetics/brca-fact-sheet [Accessed February 2021].
  6. Li MM et al. J Mol Diagn. 2017; 19: 4-23.
  7. George A et al. Sci Rep. 2016; 6: 29506.